A painter who used bright colored oil and watercolor with many white tones and luminous* affects, Thomas Miles Richardson, Junior, made his reputation with landscape and marine subjects that included genre and coastal scenes and reflected his special fascination with the Italian and Swiss Alps.  His dramatic, panoramic vistas are suggestive of Hudson River School* painters in America.  

As well as his own surroundings in bucolic Cumberland, inspiration came from Richardson's extensive travels: castles in Wales, Yorkshire, Westmoreland, and along the Rhine River; coastal and marine scenes of Italy such as Amalfi and Lake Como; lochs of Scotland; and scenes from Germany, and Sicily.  Some of his landscapes had genre figures such as persons fishing or tilling fields.  

Richardson, studied landscape painting with his father, Thomas Miles Richardson, Senior (1813-1890), and then established his studio in Newcastle, England.  From there he sent works to England, which first were exhibited in 1832.  In 1846, he moved to London, where three years earlier, he had been elected to associate membership in the 'original' Society of Painters in Watercolour.  In 1851, he achieved full membership.

During his life he exhibited at Agnew & Sons Gallery (4), Walker Gallery Liverpool (5), Manchester City Art Gallery (3), Royal Society of Watercolour Painters (61) and Arthur Tooth & Sons Gallery (4).

His paintings are in the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Art Gallery of Greater Victoria; Harvard University Art Museums; Tate Gallery; Tyne & Wear Museums; and Wichita Art Museum